Sensing & Computing

Materials science underpins every aspect of our modern computers and telecommunications infrastructure, and will enable those of tomorrow.  Ultra-low energy memory storage; next-gen semiconductors that can bridge the green gap and provide full spectrum displays; solid-state pixels for programmable photomasks: these are all examples of our faculty’s extensive work in the field.

Researchers

Alfredo Alexander-Katz

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Alexander-Katz is using biologically-inspired synthetic self-assembly to develop structure at a nanoscale, with a goal of creating customized, programmable, active soft matter.

Polina Anikeeva

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Professor in Brain and Cognitive Sciences; McGovern Institute for Brain Research; Associate Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics

Professor Anikeeva designs flexible multi-material devices that understand, interface with, and control the cellular and nervous systems in the human body, across multiple functional modalities. These devices have the capability to repair tissue, make diagnoses, and act as prosthetics.

Geoffrey S.D. Beach

Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Co-director, Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) at MIT

Professor Beach is working toward creating low-power, high-speed memory and computing devices by studying and manipulating the spin properties of nanoscale magnetic materials.

Yoel Fink

Professor of Materials Science; Joint Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Professor Fink's group is designing and synthesizing multifunctional fibers that can incorporate electronic properties for everything from smart fabrics to artificial limbs.

Eugene A. Fitzgerald

Merton C. Flemings-SMA Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; CEO and director of the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology

Professor Fitzgerald develops novel semiconductor technology leveraging lattice-mismatched materials and integration III-V electronic and optoelectronic devices on silicon. His work in innovation couples fundamental research with a strong focus on processes to drive new technologies into the marketplace.

Juejun (JJ) Hu

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Hu designs integrated photonic devices on a chip scale platform that offer more efficient and enhanced performance relative to their bulky counterparts. These are used in chemical molecule sensing, high speed optical communications, and optical devices integrated with biological tissues.

Rafael Jaramillo

Thomas Lord Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Jaramillo invents and investigates next-gen chalcogenide semiconductors for applications in optoelectronics, computing, and solar energy conversion.

Jeehwan Kim

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Kim is engineering single-crystalline 2D materials for applications from flexible electronics to neuromorphic devices.

Lionel C. Kimerling

Thomas Lord Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Kimerling designs and builds silicon-based microphotonics that integrate electronic and optical devices towards solutions in signal interconnection, signal sensing, and image sensing.

James M. LeBeau

John Chipman Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor LeBeau connects structure to properties using electron microscopy and advanced data analytics to inform where defects and interfaces are and the chemical nature of those structures. This cutting-edge characterization approach informs behavior of ferroelectrics, semiconductors, materials for quantum computing, structural materials and energy storage.

Robert J. Macfarlane

Paul M. Cook Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Macfarlane synthesizes hierarchically structured polymer nanocomposites via self-assembly for application in coatings, structural materials, optical wave guides, drug delivery, filtration, adhesives, and battery electrolytes.

Caroline A. Ross

Associate Head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Toyota Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Caroline Ross develops magnetic, ferroelectric, magnetooptical, and multiferroic complex oxide thin films including perovskites, garnets, and nanocomposites for memory, logic, and photonic devices, and self-assembled block copolymers for nanolithography and nanofabrication.

Frances M. Ross

Ellen Swallow Richards Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Frances Ross designs new methods of in situ microscopy, allowing views of material growth in real time at the atomic scale and giving insight into how complex nanostructures can be formed.

Carl V. Thompson

Stavros Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering; Director, Materials Research Laboratory (MRL) at MIT

Professor Thompson studies the evolution and control of nano- and meso-scale structures. Current research focuses effects of structure evolution on the performance and reliability of materials used in thin-film batteries, electronic devices such as high-performance transistors, and microelectronic integrated circuits.

Harry L. Tuller

R.P. Simmons Professor of Ceramics and Electronic Materials

Professor Tuller studies defect and nano structure and its implication at multiple levels and across many properties for metal oxide materials towards functional application in energy conversion and storage and memory devices.

Bilge Yildiz

Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering; Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Professor Yildiz's work advances next generation energy conversion, storage and information processing, based on solid state ionic-electronic materials, in aplications such as fuel cells, electrolyzers, batteries and energy-efficent hardware for brain-inspired computing.

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