Self Assembly

Natural materials are a perfect example of self assembly; shells, trees, bones, and more build themselves with no direction. Materials scientists are creating molecules that can come together to build a more complex, defined arrangement or functional unit.

Researchers

Alfredo Alexander-Katz

Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Bio; Biophysics; Computational Materials Science; Condensed Matter Physics; Nanotechnology; Polymers; Self Assembly

Robert J. Macfarlane

Paul M. Cook Associate Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

Biomaterials; Materials Chemistry; Mechanical Behavior of Materials; Nanotechnology; Photonic Materials; Polymers; Self Assembly; Composites

Julia Ortony

Finmeccanica Assistant Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

Environment; Materials Chemistry; Nanotechnology; Self Assembly

Caroline A. Ross

Associate Head of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering; Toyota Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

Electronic Materials; Magnetic Materials; Nanotechnology; Polymers; Self Assembly; Surfaces, Interfaces, and Thin Films

Frances M. Ross

Ellen Swallow Richards Professor in Materials Science and Engineering

Electrochemistry; Self Assembly; Semiconductors; Surfaces, Interfaces, and Thin Films

Edwin L. Thomas

Morris Cohen Professor Emeritus of Materials Science and Engineering

Photonic Materials; Polymers; Self Assembly

News