Donald R. Sadoway

  • John F. Elliott Professor of Materials Chemistry
  • B.A.Sc., Engineering Science, University of Toronto, 1972
  • M.A.Sc., Chemical Metallurgy, University of Toronto, 1973
  • Ph.D., Chemical Metallurgy, University of Toronto, 1977

Electrochemistry; Energy Storage; Environment; Materials Processing; Materials Chemistry; Metallurgy

Donald R. Sadoway

Research

Professor Sadoway's research seeks to establish the scientific underpinnings for technologies that make efficient use of energy and natural resources in an environmentally sound manner. This spans engineering applications and the supportive fundamental science. The overarching theme of his work is electrochemistry in nonaqueous media.

Specific topics in applied research are the following: environmentally sound electrochemical extraction and recycling of metals, lithium solid-polymer-electrolyte batteries, advanced materials for use as electrodes, separators, and walls in fused-salt electrolysis cells and batteries, electrochemical sensors, electrochemical synthesis of thin films of compound semiconductors in fused-salt and cryogenic media, and electrochemically controlled superconducting devices.

Related to these are the following topics in fundamental research: the physical chemistry and electrochemistry of molten salts (including molten oxides), cryogenic electrolytes, and solid polymer electrolytes.

Recent News

Sadoway on The Future of Battery Storage and Renewable Energies

"Recently I had the chance to speak with one of those visionaries: A scientist who has spent an entire career working on (and inventing) grid-level renewable energy storage mechanisms. Professor Donald Sadoway is a current MIT professor, an inventor with over a dozen patents, and a 2012 TIME “…  

Don Sadoway will Keynote The Battery Show 2018

The Battery Show, North America's largest advanced battery technology event, has announced that Don Sadoway will be one of the keynote speakers at the 2018 event, where he will discuss his groundbreaking work on the liquid metal battery. About Dr. Donald R. Sadoway:…  

Aluminum production could get much better for the environment

You probably don’t think about aluminum very much. But you should. The ubiquitous metal is in airplanes, iPhones, and engine blocks made by General Motors, to name just a few uses. A 12-inch MacBook, for example, consists of over half a pound of aluminum. And since the late 19th century, the…  

A new approach to rechargeable batteries

A type of battery first invented nearly five decades ago could catapult to the forefront of energy storage technologies, thanks to a new finding by researchers at MIT. The battery, based on electrodes made of sodium and nickel chloride and using a new type of metal mesh membrane, could be used…  

10 years of energy research at MIT

Q: What are some of the most significant research impacts the MIT energy community has made over the past decade? A: While the horizon for the majority of energy research we do here at MIT is generally at least several decades, some researchers have already been able to translate their…