Study offers guidance for targeting residual ovarian tumors

May 23, 2017

A new study conducted by Michael Cima explores ways to improve chemotherapy strategies for ovarian cancer, and how to determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from a new implantable device that could make intraperitoneal chemotherapy more bearable.

"Most women diagnosed with ovarian cancer undergo surgery to remove as many of the tumors as possible. However, it is usually impossible to eliminate all of the cancer cells because they have spread throughout the abdomen. Surgery is therefore followed by 18 weeks of chemotherapy.

Delivering chemotherapy drugs directly to the abdomen through a catheter offers better results than other methods, but this regimen suffers from significant complications, and many patients are unable to complete it.

MIT researchers who are working on an implantable device that could make intraperitoneal chemotherapy more bearable have published a new study that offers insight into how to improve chemotherapy strategies for ovarian cancer, and how to determine which patients would be most likely to benefit from this device." -MIT News

a micrograph of ovarian cancer.
A micrograph of ovarian cancer.

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