News: Subra Suresh

How to bend and stretch a diamond

Diamond is well-known as the strongest of all natural materials, and with that strength comes another tightly linked property: brittleness. But now, an international team of researchers from MIT, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Korea has found that when grown in extremely tiny, needle-like shapes,…  

New property found in unusual crystalline materials

Most metals and semiconductors, from the steel in a knife blade to the silicon in a solar panel, are made up of many tiny crystalline grains. The way these grains meet at their edges can have a major impact on the solid’s properties, including mechanical strength, electrical conductivity,…  

Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies

Cells secrete nanoscale packets called exosomes that carry important messages from one part of the body to another. Scientists from MIT and other institutions have now devised a way to intercept these messages, which could be used to diagnose problems such as cancer or fetal abnormalities.…  

NEW.Mech 2017

NEW.Mech is a one-day workshop that aims to bring together the New England Mechanics community with an interest in exploring new directions in the mechanics of materials and structures, and to provide an opportunity to share the latest…  

How the spleen filters blood

Subra Suresh and Ming Dao have discovered that the shape and size of blood cells is determined by a tiny opening in the spleen called the interendothelial slit, where the cells undergo a sort of "physical fitness test" before they're able to continue circulating.  " '…  

Using sound waves to detect rare cancer cells

Cancer cells often break free from their original locations and circulate through the bloodstream, allowing them to form new tumors elsewhere in the body. Detecting these cells could give doctors a new way to predict whether patients’ tumors will metastasize, or monitor how they are responding…  

Professor Suresh named Franklin Institute Laureate

Professor Suresh, who is currently serving as director of the National Science Foundation, will receive the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science for his contributions to understanding the mechanisms of materials. See the…  

New understanding of malaria protein

Protein impedes microcirculation of malaria-infected red blood cells; MIT-led research team finds that protein significantly reduces infected cells’ ability to squeeze through tiny channels compared to healthy cells. See the…  

Professor Suresh elected to NAS

Congratulations to Professor Subra Suresh who has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences!  Prof. Suresh is currently head of the National Science Foundation.  

Professor Suresh receives 2011 Nadai Medal from ASME

Congratulations to Prof. Subra Suresh on receiving the 2011 Nadai Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers! Prof. Suresh, the current head of the National Science Foundation, is honored for his pioneering contributions to the field of fracture and fatigue of engineering materials…  

Prof. Suresh tapped as NSF head

On Thursday, June 3, President Obama announced his intent to nominate Prof. Subra Suresh as Director of the National Science Foundation.  Prof. Suresh joined the DMSE faculty in 1993 and served as the Department Head prior to his appointment as Dean of Engineering.  Learn more about the…  

Prof. Suresh to receive honorary doctorate

Recognized for his role as a pioneering researcher in cellular and molecular nanomechanics, Prof. Subra Suresh, Dean of the School of Engineering, will receive an honorary doctorate from the…