News: Geoffrey S.D. Beach

A new way to control magnets

Reversible system can flip the magnetic orientation of particles with a small voltage; could lead to faster data storage and smaller sensors.  

Controllable Spintronics

A new approach to controlling magnetism in a microchip could open the doors to memory, computing, and sensing devices that consume drastically less power than existing versions. The approach could also overcome some of the inherent physical limitations that have been slowing progress in this…  

Ferrimagnets speed up racetrack memories

Spintronics devices, which exploit the spin of an electron as well as its charge, could be ideal for use in high-density data storage devices and for next generation information processing. One promising technology involves using magnetic solitons, such as nanoscale domain walls and magnetic…  

Deshpande Center and J-WAFS announce fall 2017 research grants

The MIT Deshpande Center for Technological Innovation announced today the award of $768,000 in grants to 17 MIT research teams currently working on early-stage technologies. DMSE-related projects include: "Structured Nucleic Acid Nanoparticle Therapeutic Delivery Platform" — Mark Bathe,…  

Fast-moving magnetic particles could enable new form of data storage

New research from the Beach Group has shown that an exotic kind of magnetic behavior discovered just a few years ago holds great promise as a way of storing data — one that could overcome fundamental limits that might otherwise be signaling the end of “Moore’s Law,” which describes the ongoing…  

Geoffrey Beach: Drawn to explore magnetism

Geoffrey Beach has been tinkering and building things most of his life, but it wasn’t until his undergraduate studies in physics that he zeroed in on the topic that has dominated his research ever since: the study of magnetism and how to control it. “There are many thousands of…  

Current-induced switching in a magnetic insulator

Nature Magazine published a paper written by Prof. Geoffrey Beach and his collaborator Prof. Caroline Ross who have shown that a pure spin current can be injected into in an electrically insulating material, and be used to switch its magnetization direction. This is striking because, in…  

Newly tenured DMSE faculty

Please congratulate the two DMSE faculty who have been awarded tenure this year: Alfredo Alexander-Katz, the Walter Henry Gale (1929) Career Development Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. His research combines theory and simulations to develop a deep…  

Spin Designers: a New Year of Spintronic Research

Computers are basically machines that process information in the form of electronic zeros and ones. But two DMSE faculty members are trying to change that. Caroline Ross, Toyota Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, and Geoffrey Beach, Class of '58 Associate Professor of…  

Controlling a material with voltage

A new way of switching the magnetic properties of a material using just a small applied voltage, developed by researchers at MIT and collaborators elsewhere, could signal the beginning of a…  

New discoveries in magnetic thin films

A magnetic phenomenon newly discovered by MIT researchers could lead to much faster, denser, and more energy-efficient chips for memory and computation. See the…  

An electrical switch for magnetism

Researchers at MIT have developed a new way of controlling the motion of magnetic domains — the key technology in magnetic memory systems, such as a computer’s hard disk. The new approach requires little power to write and no power to maintain the stored information, and could lead to a new…  

Faculty Promotions announced

  Profs. Alfredo Alexander-Katz and Geoff Beach will both be promoted to the rank of Associate Professor as of July 1, 2013. Please congratulate Alfredo and Geoff.  The levels of research, teaching, and service excellence needed to reach this milestone are significant, and their…  

Oscillating magnetic particles

Oscillating microscopic beads could be key to biolab on a chip. Professor Geoff Beach and his team finds way to manipulate and measure magnetic particles without contact, potentially enabling multiple medical tests on a tiny device. See the full story from the…