News: Research

Sadoway on The Future of Battery Storage and Renewable Energies

"Recently I had the chance to speak with one of those visionaries: A scientist who has spent an entire career working on (and inventing) grid-level renewable energy storage mechanisms. Professor Donald Sadoway is a current MIT professor, an inventor with over a dozen patents, and a 2012 TIME “…   more

Soft Hardware Developed by Yoel Fink

The latest development in textiles and fibers is a kind of soft hardware that you can wear: cloth that has electronic devices built right into it. Researchers at MIT have now embedded high speed optoelectronic semiconductor devices, including light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and diode…   more

Cima part of team that developed new, more accurate neural implants

New technologies such as optogenetics have allowed us to identify similar microstructures in the brain. However, these techniques rely on liquid infusions into the brain, which prepare the regions to be studied to respond to light. These infusions are done with large needles, which do not have…   more

DMSE Faculty host summer undergraduate researchers

From simulating the physics of spinning magnetic particles to fabricating new materials for infrared chemical sensing, MIT Materials Research Laboratory summer researchers will challenge themselves to learn new skills and develop new scientific insights. A diverse group of top-performing…   more

New Neural Implants developed by Prof. Cima

New technologies such as optogenetics have allowed us to identify similar microstructures in the brain. However, these techniques rely on liquid infusions into the brain, which prepare the regions to be studied to respond to light. These infusions are done with large needles, which do not have…   more

Cem Tasan Featured on School of Engineering YouTube Channel

Cem Tasan is a modern metallurgist who compares metallurgy to cooking--it requires the creation and discovery of recipes using different metals in order to obtain a final product with desirable properties. One property Prof. Tasan has been particularly fascinated with perfecting in his "cooking…   more

Elsa Olivetti Uses AI to Identify New Materials Fabrication

MIT researchers and their collaborators have demonstrated a novel system using artificial-intelligence techniques to help identify methods of fabricating materials, especially those that look promising in computer simulations. In one test, the system scanned half a million journal articles,…   more

Revolutionizing everyday products with artificial intelligence

“Who is Bram Stoker?” Those three words demonstrated the amazing potential of artificial intelligence. It was the answer to a final question in a particularly memorable 2011 episode of Jeopardy!. The three competitors were former champions Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings, and Watson, a…   more

Aluminum production could get much better for the environment

You probably don’t think about aluminum very much. But you should. The ubiquitous metal is in airplanes, iPhones, and engine blocks made by General Motors, to name just a few uses. A 12-inch MacBook, for example, consists of over half a pound of aluminum. And since the late 19th century, the…   more

Enhanced water retention

Abstract:  The change from wet and soft to dry and hard is a viscoelastic to solid material transition widely displayed in nature, in particular in materials rich in metal-coordinate crosslinking. How metal-coordinate crosslink dynamics contribute to macromolecular…   more

From DMSE to Japan: Mina Blume's transition

Mina Blume, a recent MIT graduate of MIT Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE), translates her MIT International Science & Technology Initiatives (MISTI) introduction of Japan into a space-program research project. …   more

Improving mid-infrared imaging and sensing

A new way of taking images in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum, developed by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, could enable a wide variety of applications, including thermal imaging, biomedical sensing, and free-space communication. The mid-infrared (mid-IR) band of electromagnetic…   more

How to bend and stretch a diamond

Diamond is well-known as the strongest of all natural materials, and with that strength comes another tightly linked property: brittleness. But now, an international team of researchers from MIT, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Korea has found that when grown in extremely tiny, needle-like shapes,…   more

Self-healing metal oxides could protect against corrosion

Researchers have found that a solid oxide protective coating for metals can, when applied in sufficiently thin layers, deform as if it were a liquid, filling any cracks and gaps as they form. The thin coating layer should be especially useful to prevent leakage of tiny molecules that can…   more

Reversible Mn2+/Mn4+ double redox in lithium-excess cathode materials

Abstract: There is an urgent need for low-cost, resource-friendly, high-energy-density cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries to satisfy the rapidly increasing need for electrical energy storage. To replace the nickel and cobalt, which are limited resources and are…   more

A new way to find better battery materials

A new approach to analyzing and designing new ion conductors — a key component of rechargeable batteries — could accelerate the development of high-energy lithium batteries, and possibly other energy storage and delivery devices such as fuel cells, researchers say. The new approach relies…   more

Study reveals why polymer stents failed

MIT Researchers in DMSE and the Institute for Medical Engineering have discovered why biodegradable polymer stents failed over time, hoping to eventually design and evaluate polymer stents more effectively. Jeff Grossman is among several MIT-based authors in a paper that appears in the    more

Investing in Tech That’s Worth the Wait

Innovations in fields like energy and transportation often take time—and extra support—to develop. The Engine at MIT is helping them make the leap from the lab to the marketplace. Liquid separation wouldn’t top most people’s lists of world-changing technologies. But consider this: every…   more

Getting to the heart of carbon nanotube clusters

Integrating nanoscale fibers such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into commercial applications, from coatings for aircraft wings to heat sinks for mobile computing, requires them to be produced in large scale and at low cost. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising approach to manufacture CNTs…   more